Stanley Kurtz, in his June 7 article "Obama's Third-Party History" for National Review Online, reports that Barack Obama’s connection to far-left radicals is much more recent that had been previously thought. On January 11, 1996, Kurtz notes, Obama joined the New Party, a radical socialist political movement deeply opposed to capitalism and of the opinion that the Democratic Party was far too moderate.  The New Party sought to transform America into the sort of socialist democracy that is common in Europe.

In his latest statement to his supporters, Republican presidential candidate Ron Paul answered a number of questions but left open many more. After announcing in May that he would no longer participate in any other presidential primaries but would concentrate instead on states where primaries had already been held in the hopes of generating additional support, his supporters now know two things: With 200 bound delegates he has no chance of winning the Republican nomination in Tampa, Florida, over the weekend of August 27. But he expects there will be more than 500 delegates there supporting his position, which is far more than anyone anticipated.

Every year he has been in office President Obama has made it a point to cozy up to America’s tiny homosexual activist minority by officially recognizing June as “Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Pride Month.” This year, of course, was no exception. Having just come out officially in favor of legalizing same-sex “marriage,” the President followed up on June 1 by issuing this year’s proclamation setting aside the entire month to commemorate the valuable contributions that gays, lesbians, transvestites, and an odds-and-ends assortment of sexually- and gender-confused individuals have made to American society.

The United States continues its slow morphing into Big Brotherdom, this time through the use of cameras  in the San Francisco transporation system that predict crimes before they take place based on “suspicious” behavior. 

At a pre-trial hearing on Wednesday, lawyers for PFC Bradley Manning submitted a motion requesting that 10 of the 22 charges against their client be dropped. Specifically, Manning’s legal team argued for dismissal of eight specifications of having violated the Espionage Act, as well as two charges of exceeding authorized access.

Manning’s attorneys previously petitioned the military judge presiding over their client’s court martial to drop other charges facing Manning that they claimed were duplications. That motion was denied.

 

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