Now that Attorney General Eric Holder has appointed two U.S. Attorneys to investigate the alleged “leaks” of classified information many suspect originated in the White House, James Clapper, the Director of National Intelligence is piling on by announcing that all intelligence agents and officials may be subjected to polygraph testing if they are suspected of leaking information to the media.

“The United States is abandoning its role as the global champion of human rights,” former President Jimmy Carter charged in a June 24 op-ed in the New York Times, charging the United States government with assassination attempts through the use of drones and massive domestic surveillance against the privacy rights of American citizens. But Carter cited the United Nations' Universal Declaration of Human Rights rather than the U.S. Bill of Rights as the inspiration to follow and restore a respect for the inalienable rights of others.

American taxpayers dole out $80 billion every year to subsidize food stamps for the poor, but are unsure of where and how their hard-earned dollars are being spent. Ranging from candy to potato chips to steak dinners, food stamps can be used to purchase a variety of foods, and are accepted at gas stations, fast-food restaurants, retail stores, and in some areas, even high-scale restaurants.

Taxpayers, however, only have a vague understanding of where their dollars are going, because the government says it cannot disclose sales figures stemming from food stamp purchases — and even if it could, the specific types of foods being purchased would not be accessible. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), which partners with states to manage the program, argues that disclosing sales for food stamps, also known as the Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program (SNAP), would amount to unveiling trade secrets.

 

Investigation into the "Fast and Furious" gun-walking scandal continues to reveal disturbing developments. On Sunday, Representative Darrell Issa, chairman of the House Oversight Committee that is leading the investigation into the operation, told ABC News’ Jake Tapper that pertinent emails revealed that the agenda of the operation was to advocate for greater gun control, not as alleged to pursue criminal prosecutions of drug cartel members.

Found guilty and sentenced to 25 years in prison, communist Russian arms dealer Viktor Bout may be headed back home to Russia not even a year into his prison sentence. The plan to repatriate Bout and Russian pilot Konstantin Yaroshenko comes from Russia’s Deputy Foreign Minister Sergei Ryabkov.

 

 

 

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