Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker has survived a recall effort by angry state employees, cruising to a decisive victory over Democratic challenger Tom Barrett.

Florida State Attorney Angela Corey, who is prosecuting George Zimmerman for second-degree murder in the killing of Trayvon Martin, reportedly threatened to sue Harvard University over the barrage of stinging criticism made by law Prof. Alan Dershowitz about the controversial prosecution. The well-known professor publicized the threats on Tuesday.

According to Dershowitz’s account, in a recent phone call to the Ivy League law school, the special prosecutor said she would seek to have the Bar Association discipline him for his harsh comments about alleged prosecutorial misconduct. Corey also warned Harvard of potential legal action, the professor said, for alleged libel and slander.

But if the goal was to intimidate or silence Prof. Dershowitz, Corey failed miserably.

U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) officials have filed a brief in federal district court in opposition to a historian’s bid to unseal records pertaining to the Watergate political scandal in the 1970s, which led to the resignation of President Richard Nixon. While the DOJ agrees that some of the Watergate papers should be released, it remains steadfastly opposed to making public the documents related to wiretap information, claiming that it is safeguarding the privacy rights of innocent people.

The Watergate scandal dates back to an incident on June 17, 1972, when five men affiliated with the Nixon reelection campaign and the CIA were caught breaking into the offices of the Democratic National Committee in the Watergate office complex in Washington, D.C. and arrested. The arrests led to a major cover-up in an attempt to prevent the burglars from being tied to President Nixon.

Last week, several major news outlets reported on a Statement of Administration Policy (SAP) released by the White House regarding the Fiscal Year 2013 version of the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA), in which President Obama gives 32 reasons why he is likely to veto the newest iteration of the NDAA.

The headlines announcing the President’s promise to reject the NDAA are identical to those published early last December, just a couple of weeks before the President took time off from his Hawaiian vacation to sign the measure into law. Somehow, President Obama was able to set aside his issues with the act and grant himself the power to indefinitely detain Americans without charge or trial.

Recently, we reported how those very provisions — those purporting to give the President the expansive and unconstitutional powers described above — remain in this year’s NDAA, despite the best efforts of a handful of constitutionally-minded representatives.

 

The Environmental Protection Agency reportedly has been using aircraft to spy on cattle ranchers in Iowa and Nebraska. Nebraska’s congressional delegation recently submitted a joint letter to EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson expressing concerns about the surveillance, to which the EPA replied that its use of the craft is well within the legal boundaries, as well as “cost-effective.”

The EPA's surveillance has covered Region 7, comprised of Iowa, Nebraska, Kansas, and Missouri, though it has focused primarily on Nebraska and Iowa, because of the high concentration in those two states of livestock feeding operations in watersheds that have histories of contamination.

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