The latest skirmish in the war over labor has touched ground in Indiana, where Republican and Democratic state representatives are sparring over whether to adopt a right-to-work law which would prohibit union contracts in private-sector work environments to mandate dues or other fees to a union. The highly contentious squabble provoked Democrats to boycott the Indiana House floor on Wednesday, preventing the Republican majority from conducting business.

In more than half of the 50 states, a worker has the option of not joining a union in order to hold a job. In those states where such an elementary freedom exists, the economic condition is more vibrant than in states where union membership, once it is gained at a place of business, is mandatory.

President Obama has once again bypassed the U.S. Congress and used the process of recess appointment to name members to the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) without congressional approval. He took advantage of the same ploy at the start of the year to name former Ohio Attorney General Richard Cordray as the nation’s chief consumer watchdog. Obama's latest actions have prompted some to question his understanding of the U.S. Constitution.

The push is on to empower the International Criminal Court, the United Nations' global tribunal that claims universal jurisdiction to prosecute individuals for war crimes, crimes against humanity, genocide, and aggression. Over the past year, the Obama administration, acting primarily through Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, has been ratcheting up the campaign to legitimize the ICC as a global prosecutor and Supreme Court.

After capturing second place in the Iowa Republican caucuses, losing by a meager eight votes to former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney, GOP presidential hopeful Rick Santorum is positioned to be the latest subject under the media's microscope. When one becomes a frontrunner, the scrutiny quickly begins, and the question hovering over the former Pennsylvania Senator's head is: Is Rick Santorum really the authentic conservative he proclaims to be?

Only hours after the Iowa caucuses closed, critics spelled out their cases as to why Santorum is not the "one true conservative running in 2012," which his campaign has been exuding since its original conception. Syndicated columnist David Harsanyi accused the presidential contender of being a "conservative technocrat," and a veritable bearer of "big-government conservatism."

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