As the so-called trilateral North American “integration” process marches onward toward an ever-closer union between the governments of Canada, the United States, and Mexico, national law-enforcement agents are slowly creeping across borders through a variety of shadowy schemes. Going forward, that trend is set to accelerate, according to officials, who say government functionaries may soon be able to chase and arrest suspects outside of their own nations. But critics of the controversial plan are fighting back with increasing urgency.

While the European Union — many of whose member states are facing dire economic crises — struggles to convince the world of its significance and necessity, it has taken on another agenda: Internet control. Reports indicate that the EU will soon be creating a mandatory electronic ID system for all citizens of the European Union.

The EU's Digital Agenda Commissioner, Neelie Kroes, asserts that the legislation will promote “the adoption of harmonized e-signatures, e-identities and electronic authentication services (eIAS) across EU member states.”

With several leading candidates closely tied to the Mubarak regime, Egyptians are casting their ballots in the first presidential election since the “Arab Spring.” And with balloting taking place and the election results likely to be released next week, the two frontrunners are men with a background which may fall short of the expectations of many Islamist extremists.

Chen Guangcheng, the Chinese pro-life dissident who suffered years of abuse and imprisonment at the hands of Beijing’s communist government for exposing its cruel one-child abortion policy, has been given his freedom. Chen, his wife, and their two children landed at Newark Airport in Jersey May 12, and were immediately whisked to New York City, where Chen spoke to a crowd at New York University (NYU), briefly recounting his ordeal and renewing his commitment to battle the tyranny and injustice he and millions of others have suffered under China’s repressive government.

The newest edition to the list of wobbling fiscal systems is Italy, the fourth largest economy in Europe and the seventh largest economy in the world. The Italian economy is the same size of Greece, Spain, Portugal and Ireland all combined. Italy may be "too big to fail," but the nation is still facing ever increasing — and apparently insurmountable — problems. 

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