Religious and human rights leaders from around the world have stepped forward to defend a Pakistani Christian girl who has been arrested and jailed for the supposed crime of blasphemy. Rimsha Masih, who is believed to be around 11 years old and who reportedly has Down syndrome, was accused in mid-August of burning a booklet containing scripture from the Quran, and for throwing the burned pages into the garbage. According to Mission Network News, the girl, who is from a rural area of Mehrabadi in Islamabad, was taken by a mob that threatened to burn the homes of Christians in the area unless she was arrested by the police.

LifeSiteNews reports that the European Court of Human Rights has found that an Italian law that prohibits genetic screening of in vitro embryos “…violates the right to respect for private and family life.” Consequently, the court found that the Italians law violates Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights.

The ruling drew strong support from far-left politicians such as Nichi Vendola, a homosexual activist who called the decision a “wise judgment.” But Maurizio Sacconi, a former welfare minister in Italy who served in the center-right coalition, said, “I’m sure that the Italian government will appeal against the judgment. The defense of a state law is a must in principle and in this case also justified on the merits. Italy cannot in any way, in the absence of conscious parliamentary will, surreptitiously take the path of genetic selection.”

 

 

German political leaders, as well as other European politicians, seem to doubt that Greece is on the right track, meaning possibly unmanageable problems for the eurozone may be right around the corner.

 

The communist dictatorship ruling mainland China uses its so-called “news agencies” and “journalists” to spy on dissidents and foreign governments, charged Canadian author and reporter Mark Bourrie, who resigned from the regime’s Xinhua service after realizing what was going on. He recently blew the whistle on the scheme — long suspected by intelligence agencies and well documented by analysts — with an explosive August 23 article in Ottawa Magazine.

According to Bourrie, a respected journalist with insider access to Canadian politics, his Chinese editors regularly requested articles on critics of the regime and their activities in Canada. Those stories, unsurprisingly, were never published, sparking suspicions by Bourrie that he was being used to collect intelligence.

Metro London police are standing down and will not be storming Ecuador’s embassy according to a statement made by Ecuador’s President Rafeal Correa. "We consider this unfortunate incident over, after a grave diplomatic error by the British in which they said they would enter our embassy," Correa said on Saturday in a weekly media address.

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