Yet another alleged massacre of civilians by the Syrian regime was in the establishment press headlines this week, supposedly a brutal killing spree by dictator Bashar al-Assad’s forces in the village of Tremseh that left up to 250 people dead. As has become typical, Western governments and mainstream media outlets — the New York Times, the BBC, and others included — parroted anonymous “opposition activists” for the claims. But within days, after foreign powers seeking regime change had their chance to beat the war drums even louder, the carefully constructed tale was already falling apart.

Moody’s Investors Service announced on July 12 that it was downgrading Italian government bonds by two notches in response to the continuing financial problems of Europe. The Italian bond rating went from A3 to Baa2, which makes the sovereign debt instruments of seventh largest economy of the world just two notches ahead of “junk bonds.”  The move — which surprised Italian officials — came at a bad time for the Italian government, which was auctioning off €5.25 billion on Friday.

The unborn are now a little safer in Liechtenstein.

Voters have upheld the right of Crown Prince Alois Philipp Maria of the Central European principality to veto referenda passed by voters — a right that was threatened after he promised to veto a referendum to legalize abortion.

That referendum failed, but introducing what Ann Coulter calls the liberals' "holiest sacrament" of abortion into the Catholic monarchy could have ended the political role of its royals had voters taken away the prince’s right to veto referenda.

 

The United Nations is working on a treaty that would impact Second Amendment rights in the United States. The pact would reveal the records of America’s gun owners to foreign governments and has the potential to place the Second Amendment under international scrutiny.

If the definition of the word “terrorist” has seemed somewhat flexible to many Americans in recent years, that state of befuddlement is shared by the U.S. government. The difficulties of defining a “terrorist” were on display on Capitol Hill when a high-ranking State Department official declared that the Nigerian Jihadist group Boko Haram — one of the most violent Islamist organizations in Africa — to be a “terrorist” organization, while explaining that it was not a Foreign Terrorist Organization (FTO).

Affiliates and Friends

Social Media